Kruiskamp Veilig (Kruiskamp Safe)

Kruiskamp is a district of Amersfoort, a midsize city in The Netherlands having about 145.000 residents. The average income in Kruiskamp is low. The Kruiskamp district was facing a high number of domestic burglaries and other problems in 2007 and 2008, problems which threatened the safety and security in the area, such as (domestic) violence, car burglaries, nuisance of youth, addicts and alcohol addicts. The perceived safety of its residents was very low.

In 2007 this district was chosen by the Minister of WWI (Housing and Integration) as one of the 40 districts in The Netherlands for which a special programme was being set up to improve the quality of life. The lead of the project and the communication approach was initiated by the local government, together with the police and housing associations.

To prevent further domestic burglaries, each of the 2500 houses in the area received a kit with SelectaDna, a liquid with a chemical synthetic unique dna-like pattern. It consists of microdots with a unique code. The microdots are invisibly put on expensive goods, which are being registered in a database with the associated unique dna-code. As your personal belongings are (invisibly) marked with your personal code, there is more chance to retrieve your stolen goods after being a victim of domestic burglary.

Also the local government hired two extra police agents who daily run their bikes for extra monitoring and enforcement in the district. This means visible police attendance and being easily accessible to residents. A resident’s network for safety has been started by local government, giving a platform for residents and professionals to share their ideas and worries about safety and security.

Last but not least an SMS-service was being set up. By sending an SMS residents can report problems and annoyances on safety and quality of life. The SMS becomes an e-mail which is being sent to the back office of the local government, who deals with it.

 

The project started in 2008.
Last review: December 2010.